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Toys and Games for Your Puppy

Playing regularly with your puppy will help you form a strong bond. The purpose of play is to develop skills that will be useful throughout their lives, such as impulse control. The more games you play with your puppy, the more he will consider you to be the most interesting thing in his world. Encouraging puppies to play with toys provides a good outlet for their physical and mental energies.

You puppy should have two sets of toys: toys that he can play with by himself and ‘interactive toys’ that he can only play with you. Keep the interactive toys put away so you initiate play and keep you and the toys interesting to your puppy.

Developing interest in the toy
Rather than just offer your puppy a new toy, take it out, play with it yourself, or play catch with another family member and act like you are having fun. Then put the toy away. Repeat this until your puppy is chomping at the bit to join in the play. Keep toy moving/wiggling along the ground. Then select your special toys that you will put away after every play session.

Enthusiasm first, control later
Build enthusiasm for play first, then put in controls like sit and wait later. Keep the games fun!!
Types of Games
Fetch – often preferred by herding dogs, retrievers and hounds
Tug – often preferred by guard dogs and bull breeds
Shake and Kill- often preferred by terriers

Rules of the Games
Invite your puppy to play with you often
With Tug of War, win more often than you lose
Do not play too roughly
Teach him to “Drop It” on command – stop tugging and trade for treat
Stop before your puppy gets bored – play several short sessions per day
Stop playing immediately if you feel any teeth to skin
Stop playing if your puppy begins to growl or gets over-excited
Always put the toy away after the game

Teaching impulse control
Teaching your puppy control during games will help your adult dog maintain control, even in times of stress or excitement. After your puppy has developed great enthusiasm for the games, practice sits/waits, downs/waits and recalls before and during play.

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Chew toy training

A dog is a social and inquisitive animal. He needs to do something, especially if left at home alone. What would you like your dog to do? You must provide some form of occupational therapy for your puppy to pass the day. If your puppy learns to enjoy chewing chewtoys, he will look forward to settling down quietly for some quality chewing time. It is important to teach your puppy to enjoy chewing chewtoys more than chewing household items. An effective ploy is to stuff the puppy’s chewtoys with kibble and treats. In fact, during your puppy’s first few weeks at home, put away his food bowl and, apart from using kibble as lures and rewards for training, serve all your puppy’s kibble stuffed in hollow chewtoys — Kongs, Biscuit Balls, Squirrel Dudes, Busy Buddy Footballs and sterilized bones.

For errorless chewtoy-training, adhere to a puppy confinement program. When you are away from home, leave the puppy in his puppy playroom with bed, water, toilet, and plenty of stuffed chewtoys. While you are at home, leave the puppy in his doggy den with plenty of stuffed chewtoys. Every hour after releasing the pup to relieve himself, play chewtoy games — chewtoy-search, chewtoy-fetch, and chewtoy-tug-o’-war. Your puppy will soon develop a very strong chewtoy habit because you have limited his chewing choices to a single acceptable toy, which you have made even more attractive with the addition of kibble and treats.

Once your dog has become a chewtoyaholic and has not had a chewing (or housetraining) mishap for at least three months, you may increase your puppy’s playroom to two rooms. For each subsequent month without a mistake your puppy may gain access to another room, until eventually he enjoys free run of the entire house when left at home alone. If a chewing mistake should occur, go back to the original puppy confinement program for at least a month.

In addition to preventing household destruction, teaching your puppy to become a chewtoyaholic prevents him from becoming a recreational barker because chewing and barking are obviously mutually exclusive behaviors. Also, chewtoyaholism helps your puppy learn to settle down calmly because chewing and dashing about are mutually exclusive behaviors.

Most important, chewtoy chewing keeps the puppy occupied and effectively helps prevent the development of separation anxiety.

What Is a Chewtoy?
A chewtoy is an object for the dog to chew that is neither destructible nor consumable. If your dog destroys an object, you will have to replace it, and that costs money. If your dog consumes the object, you may have to replace your dog. Eating non-food items is extremely hazardous to your dog’s health. The type of chewtoy you choose will depend on your dog’s penchant for chewing and his individual preferences. For maximum benefit, feed your dog or puppy out of a stuffed Kong or similar chewtoy – to keep him busy and satisfy his need to chew.

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Using Time Outs Effectively

There are many ways to do an effective time-out. The most important element is good timing. As soon as your pup begins to jump up on someone, bites too hard, barks for attention, or is heading for food on the kitchen table, say something that informs him that he just earned himself a time-out (like “Too bad” or “Time-out”), and then swiftly escort him to his time-out place. The whole idea of a Time Out is to withdraw attention. All attention is very rewarding for your dog and withdrawing attention is a very effective negative consequence. None of this should be done in anger – just a neutral “Too Bad” and then either remove the pup or remove yourself for 30 seconds.

• To do a time-out when you and your pup are in a puppy-proof room, you can just leave the room and shut the door.

• If your puppy is ok being left alone in the kitchen or family room, you can be the one to leave. Say “Bye” and walk into another room and close the door behind you.

• If your pup is in an area that will be fun or dangerous, you will need to tether or crate him for his time-out. To crate him, simply place him in his crate and leave. A small utility room or ex-pen serves the same purpose.

• A utility room makes a good time-out place. If you are using a bathroom, make sure that toilet paper and shower curtains are out of your pup’s reach. The more puppy-proof the room, the better.

• Tether stations can be used for time-outs and to keep your puppy out of trouble when you are nearby but unable to supervise him closely. It is handy to have several tether stations around the house, so that one is always nearby. Tether stations are simple to set up. Screw an eyehook screw into the wall or the floor and attach three feet of clothesline cable, with a clip at the end to attach to your puppy’s collar.

• A good option for time-outs when you are out and about with your pup is to put the leash under your foot so that pup cannot go anywhere or jump up on you, and to wait for a few minutes, ignoring him completely. You can do this for pulling on leash if you are unable to change directions (because of traffic or pedestrians).

• Regardless of what type of time-out you do, only release your puppy from his time-out when he has been well-mannered for at least one minute (no tugging, jumping, whining, pawing, etc.).

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